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Interviews and Talks | November 2012

Photojournalism_Links

Video of Steve McCurry shooting the Pirelli calendar…

Steve McCurry  : Pirelli Calendar 2013 behing the scenes video (Telegraph) ‘The world’s most beautiful women, including Karlie Kloss, Petra Nemcova and a heavily pregnant Adriana Lima, cover up for photojournalist Steve McCurry’s Pirelli Calendar.’

Steve McCurry’s Iconic Photographs #1 (Phaidon)

Steve McCurry’s Iconic Photographs #2 (Phaidon)

Steve McCurry (Art Space)

Steve McCurry  (YouTube) ‘Steve McCurry shares his expertise and opinions on shooting documentary photography’

Tyler Hicks on working in Gaza.

Photo © Tyler Hicks

Tyler Hicks : Working in Gaza (NYT Lens) ‘A Responsibility to Photograph, and Remember’

Bernat Armangué : The war in Gaza: photographing the conflict (Guardian) ‘Associated Press photographer Bernat Armangué tells the story behind some of his images that have featured on front pages around the world in the last week’

Don McCullin trying out Canon gear in this 27 minute video on the CPN site.

Don McCullin (CPN)  “The love affair I’ve had with photography has been total commitment and I’ve not taken any short cuts to do it.”

Don McCullin : The Art of Seeing (Guardian) ‘For the veteran war photographer, emotional awareness is the most important aspect of photography’

Don McCullin Reflects on a Career of Chasing Haunting Images (PetaPixel)

Barbara Davidson (PhotoShelter Vimeo) Luminance 2012

Photographers and NGOs : When Interest Creates a Conflict (NYT Lens) ‘Ethical Questions Raised by Photographing for NGOs’

Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini (Al Jazeera) ‘Scenes from a Syrian city under siege : An audio slideshow from Aleppo by a photographer who spent two harrowing weeks dodging bullets to cover the conflict.’

Crosses mark a field where the bodies of murdered women were dumped in Ciudad Juarez during the 1990s. (Eros Hoagland)

Conflict Photographer Eros Hoagland on His Dangerous Craft (Daily Beast)

Michael Christopher Brown (New Yorker Photo Booth) HBOs Witness: Libya

Photographers Amid Chaos (NYT) On HBOs Witness series

Miguel Medina : Up close and personal with the Syrian rebels (AFP Correspondent blog)

Massoud Hossaini (scmp.com) ‘What’s behind a Pulitzer Prize winning photo?’

Tomas van Houtryve (Oslo Freedom Forum)

Ashley Gilbertson and Ed Kashi (smdlr)

Robin Hammond on his Zimbabwe work.

Photo © Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond (RFI English)

Robin Hammond (Arte TV) NB in French

Old John G Morris interview on C-Span.

John G Morris (C-Span)

I don’t have an iPad, so haven’t experienced using Reuters’ The Wider Image app, but it does look very nice..

Reuters’ Jassim Ahmad on ‘The Wider Image’ photography app (CPN)

Lisa Wiltse (PDN) ‘Breakout Photo Essay of the Year: Lisa Wiltse’s Charcoal Kids of Ulingan’

Scout Tufankjian on the photo of the Obamas hugging which went viral after the Obama campaign tweeted on the election night…

Photo © Scout Tufankjian for Obama for America

Scout Tufankjian, the photographer of the ‘Most-Liked Photograph of All Time’ (Slate)

Laura Olin :  The Photo the Obama Campaign Almost Used for Its Victory Tweet (Slate) ‘How did the Obama campaign decide to use that photo of Barack and Michelle Obama hugging to accompany its victory tweet? The photo that became the most-retweeted, most liked photo in social media history? Campaign social media honcho Laura Olin filled Slate in by email on the gametime decision—and showed us the photo that almost made the cut.’

Damon Winter on photographing Obama in 2008 and 2012 (NYT) ‘A Face More Careworn, a Crowd Less Joyful’

Fascinating video of Stephen Wilkes talking about his Day to Night project…

Coney Island. Photograph © Stephen Wilkes

Stephen Wilkes and his Day to Night project (CBS video on PetaPixel)

Jim Urquhart : Portraying polygamy (Reuters Photographers blog)

Brian Finke  (LA Times Framework blog) ‘reFramed: In conversation with Brian Finke’

David Alan Harvey on the Vogue Italy site.

David Alan Harvey (Vogue Italy)

Elliott Erwitt (Art Space)

Peter Marlow on photographing English cathedrals (Magnum)

Magnum Photographers Ian Berry, Stuart Franklin and Peter Marlow describe their work featured in Magnum Revolution, 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom. (YouTube)

High and Low: Jim Goldberg’s Works in Process (Lightbox)

Harry Gruyaert’s best photograph – waiting for a Belgian parade (Guardian)

Photo © Samuel Aranda

Samuel Aranda’s best photograph: a woman protects her son (Guardian)

Gideon Mendel (BBC)

Pieter Hugo (YouTube)

Photo © Joel Meyerowitz

Joel Meyerowitz  (NYT) ‘A Restless Lifetime of Paying Attention’

Joel Meyerowitz : A Question of Color — Answered (NYT Lens)

Taking His Time: A Look Back at 50 Years of Joel Meyerowitz’s Photographs (Lightbox)

Joel Meyerowitz : ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’  (Guardian) | The photographer, best known for his 9/11 pictures, talks about his new book, which celebrates his 50 years of finding the ‘wow’ factor in everyday places

Joel Meyerowitz interview by Olivia Bee : ‘The Young Gun Meets the Living Legend’ (Vice)

Fred R. Conrad on photographing Meyerowitz (NYT Lens)

Lauren Greenfield on the Bait and Switch of “The Queen of Versailles” and the Importance of Good Cinematography (Documentary Channel blog)

Paul Moakley (rereveal.com)

Larissa Leclair : The Indie Photobook Library (Lightbox)

Isa Leshko (PDN) ‘Sustaining a Long-Term Photo Project’

Photographer Daniel Beltrá on his Greenpeace mission to the Arctic (Guardian) audio slideshow

Two part Ben Lowy interview on A Photo Editor.

Photo © Ben Lowy

Ben Lowy – Part 1 Part 2 (A Photo Editor)

In conversation with the writer Pete Brook of Prison Photography and WIRED. (Phonar)

Crossing Paths with Niall McDiarmid (BBC)

Sony World Photography awards Student Focus winner Asef Ali Mohammad shares his hopes and fears as he starts his career in photography  (Guardian) ‘What is life like for emerging student photographers?’

How Iwan Baan got his amazing NYC/Hurricane Sandy cover for the New York Magazine.

Cover photo © Iwan Baan

Architecture photographer Iwan Baan explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot (Poynter)

New York Magazine director of photography Jody Quon on Baan’s cover (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Great Reuters TV video of their photographers describing documenting Sandy and its aftermath

Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 15.14.32

Reuters photographers show images of the devastation caused by hurricane Sandy  (Reuters TV) ‘A witness to Sandy’s wrath’

Andrew Burton : photographing Sandy (ABC News)

Levon Biss on photographing Mario Balotelli (Lightbox)

Melissa Golden (Digital Photo Pro)

John Delaney on Hoboken, New Jersey (BJP)

In My Bag – by Daniel Berman (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by David Welker (PB)

Written by Mikko Takkunen

November 30, 2012 at 1:32 am

Interviews and Talks | October 2012

VII Photo’s International Director Nick Papadopoulos shared practical advice  for young photographers at a Canon talk in Perpignan… Canon Professional Network put the main points on their website… Includes good tips also from some of the VII members…Worth reading  by photographers young and old in my opinion…

Nick Papadopoulos (VII) : practical advice for young photographers (CPN)

Really good hour long talk Lynsey Addario gave at Side Gallery in Newcastle earlier this autumn…

Lynsey Addario (Side Gallery Vimeo) Lynsey Addario discussing her photographic practice and ‘Veiled Rebellion’ exhibiton at Side Gallery, which looks at the lives of women in Afghanistan. | 55mins

Prison Photography’s Pete Brook interviewed VII photographers who shot for the agency’s and NYC based advocacy group Think Outside The Cell’s collaborative project…

Ed Kashi   (Prison Photography)

Ron Haviv  (Prison Photography)

Ashley Gilbertson (Prison Photography)

Jessica Dimmock  (Prison Photography)

Stephanie Sinclair on NBC photoblog on her child brides project

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair (NBC)

Stephanie Sinclair (World Press Photo on Vimeo)

Ron Haviv (WBEZ on Soundcloud)

Joachim Ladefoged (Digital Pro Photo magazine)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Emaho Magazine)

Gary Knight and co talked about their Bosnia book in Perpignan… CPN shares the points on their site…

Gary Knight, Jon Jones, Tom Stoddart and Rémy Ourdan revisit Bosnia (CPN)

Peter Turnley (YouTube)

Pete Souza (MSNBC)

Teun Voeten interviewed about his book Narco Estado on the BBC World Service (Panos)

Terric talk by David Burnett at PhotoShelter’s recent Luminance event.

David Burnett (PhotoShelter)

Jeremy Bowen (Guardian)

Reuters photographers Jorge Silva and Carlos Garcia Rawlins on photographing Hugo Chavez (YouTube)

Donna Ferrato interview in burn magazine…

Conversation with Donna Ferrato (Burn)

Alessio Romenzi (LA Times Framework blog)

Katrin Koenning (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Peter diCampo : Everyday Africa (NYT Lens)

Poulomi Basu (Theworld.org)

David LaChapelle (PDN)

Phaidon interviewed Peter van Agtmael relating to his W. Eugene Smith Grant awarded project Disco Night September 11…

Ten Questions for photographer Peter van Agtmael (Phaidon)

Mark Power : From Poland, With Love (themuse.com)

Steve McCurry video, on location in Ethiopia (Phaidon)

Bruce Gilden (ASX)

Jake Chessum (A Photo Editor)

Video interview with William Klein to coincide with his exhibition at Tate Modern in London…

William Klein (Youtube)

Daido Moriyama (Youtube)

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art on William Klein + Daido Moriyama: Double Feature (Lightbox)

Susan Bright (YouTube)

Good Simon Norfolk interview…I don’t always agree with what he says,  but I do like the fact he doesn’t mince any words…

Photo © Simon Norfolk. From the project “Burke + Norfolk”

Simon Norfolk (FK Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz (Youtube)

A Conversation with Richard Misrach and Kate Orff : Petrochemical America (Aperture)

Alejandro Cartagena (A Photo Editor)

Interview with Jason Eskenazi on “Wonderland: A Fairytale of the Soviet Monolith” – A 10-Year Odyssey Around the Former Soviet Union (erickimphotography)

A Conversation with Danny Wilcox Frazier on Facing Change: Documenting America (Leica blog)

The National photo blog has been a great find…

AP photographer Manu Brabo talks about his time in Syria and covering conflicts (The National)

Daniel Etter : Witnessing Syria’s Descent Into War (Newsweek Photo Dept Tumblr)

A conversation with Neville Elder-Photographer and Film-maker (Broadbentius blog)

Ewen Spencer in Guardian’s ‘best shot’ series…

Photo © Ewen Spencer

Ewen Spencer’s best photograph: MCs at a UK garage rave (Guardian)

Ewen Spencer (BBC)

Dana Popa (Photo Parley blog)

Photo © Franco Pagetti

Franco Pagetti - From Fashion to the Frontline (Emaho Magazine)

Sebastian Rich : From war zones, photographer brings scars and searing images (NBC)

Teru Kuwayama (PhoNar)

Benjamin Chesterton (PhoNar)

Victor Cobo (Foam)

Niall McDiarmid (Document Scotland)

Maroeskja Lavigne (Word Magazine)

Martin Parr introducing us to his new book…

Martin Parr presents Life’s a Beach (Aperture Vimeo)

Photo Raw magazine’s video interview with Parr…

Martin Parr (Photo Raw)

Alec Soth (LayFlat.org)

Simon Roberts (YouTube)

Danfung Dennis (YouTube)

Brian Smith: Secrets of Great Portrait Photography (PhotoShelter webinar)

Brian Smith on How to Take Better Portraits (B&H blog)

I don’t consider myself a gearhead, but I do sometimes enjoy reading about what others have in their bags…

John Stanmeyer : What’s The Kit (Photographer’s blog)

From Photo Brigade…

In My Bags – by Robert Caplin (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Dominick Reuter (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Eric Thayer (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Keith Bedford (Photo Brigade)

David Bailey‘s India: the long click goodbye (Guardian)

Interview with Maciej Dakowicz on his “Cardiff After Dark” book Published by Thames & Hudson (erickimphotography)

Maciej Dakowicz (BBC)

Jim Mortram’s Small Town Inertia (BBC)

Tom Wood (BBC)

Tom Wood (Guardian)

Laia Abril on the Fabrica Artist Residency (PDN)

Mario Testino interview: the man who makes models super (Guardian)

Mikhail Baryshnikov (NYT Lens)

Written by Mikko Takkunen

October 30, 2012 at 8:05 pm

Posted in Interviews

Interviews and Talks | September 2012

Vice are running a great series online called Picture Perfect, interviews with photographers… Here Magnum’s Christopher Anderson…

Christopher Anderson, Picture Perfect (Vice)

Recording of a terrific panel discussion which took place in NYC at Aperture last week…Goes on for an hour, but actually feels short…

Shifting Sands: Conflict Photojournalism and Ethics (doctorswithoutborders.org) “The discussion will consider the responsibilities and consequences, intended and otherwise, of reporting on conflict. Moderated by Stephen Mayes, the panel will include Marcus Bleasdale, Jason Cone, Philip Gourevitch, Thomas Keenan, and Kira Pollack.”

How Photographers Try to Protect Their Subjects From Harm (PDN)

The cost of covering conflicts (BJP)

Interviews with Reuters’ Goran Tomasevic about working in Syria…

Photo © Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Goran Tomasevic, Street Fighting in Aleppo (NYT Lens) | Another interview (NBC News) | Another interview (Reuters)

John Stanmeyer: Instagram – It’s About Communication (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: The rise of Instagram (BJP)

William Klein is going to have a retrospective Tate Modern in London next month… Financial Times magazine interviewed him…

Photo © William Klein

William Klein (FT magazine) ‘As next month’s retrospective at Tate Modern will show, the US-born painter, photographer and film-maker has lived artistic life to the full’

Very straight-talking Q&A with David Bailey…

David Bailey (Esquire)

Aaron Huey, Photographing, and Listening to, the Lakota (NYT Lens)

Photo © Nick Ut

Nick Ut (Leica blog) “Nick Ut: The Amazing Saga And The Image That Helped End The Vietnam War” | video (Leica Vimeo)

R.I.P. Malcolm Browne.

Malcolm Browne , The Story Behind The Burning Monk (Lightbox) | Obituary (Guardian)

Photo © Emilio Morenatti

Emilio Morenatti (Guardian) ‘Emilio Morenatti lost a foot while on assignment in Afghanistan in 2009. A vehicle he and a fellow AP journalist were travelling in was hit by a bomb. Morenatti survived but his colleague was killed. Here he shares his thoughts on covering the recent London Paralympic Games and his career in photojournalism’

Emilio Morenatti (NYT Lens) ‘An Empathetic Eye on the Paralympics’

Steve McCurry tells about his 9/11 photographs…

Photo © Steve McCurry

Steve McCurry, The Ground Zero Photographs (American Photo Magazine)

Steve McCurry (Vogue Italia)

PDN interviewed Tom Stoddart about his 78 Perspectives exhibition that just closed in London…

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Tom Stoddart (PDN)

Tom Stoddart (Youtube)

Christopher Morris talked about his career as part of VII’s recent Visual Journeys seminars…

Still from video © Christopher Morris

Christopher Morris, War, Politics, Fashion (VII Magazine)

Not really an interview… but fits here… Always love to read Dave Burnett’s blog posts…

David Burnett: About Those Film Holders (Photographer’s blog)

David Burnett: A Tyranny of Ones (Photographer’s blog)

Don McCullin on Social Documentary Photography (National Media Museum Vime0)

Peter Turnley is having a retrospective in Paris… Lens blog interviewed him…

Photo © Peter Turnley

Peter Turnley (NYT Lens) ‘Four Decades of Photographing the Human Condition’

Antonio Bolfo (Ted on Youtube)

John Vink (Erik Kim blog) ‘Interview with John Vink, Magnum Photographer on his new “Quest For Land” book available on the iPad’

Terrific interview with Robert Nickelsberg and a gallery of his Afghanistan photographs taken through the years, over at Lens blog….

Photo © Robert Nickelsberg

Robert Nickelsberg, A Long View of Afghanistan’s Wars (NYT Lens)

Giles Duley (NBC News) “‘I’m myself again’: Photographer Giles Duley returns to work after Afghanistan blast” | Another interview (Guardian)

Paolo Marchetti, The rise of fascism in Europe (BJP)

Zed Nelson (Hackney Citizen)

NYT Lens posted an interview with some of the NOOR members to coincide with the agency’s five year anniversary…

Photo © Alixandra Fazzina

NOOR, A Collective Eye on Social Justice (NYT Lens)

Martin Schoeller’s and Matthew Modine’s Experiences (Capture on Youtube)

Graciela Iturbide‘s best photograph: a Mexican Seri woman (Guardian)

Yet another brilliant interview by Photo Raw… This time it’s with Barbara Davidson…

Barbara Davidson (Photo Raw)

Seamus Murphy, Poetry in Motion (VII Magazine)

Jessica Dimmock, Facts and Fictions (VII Magazine)

Venetia Dearden, My Life, My Style (VII Magazine)

Misha Friedman (LA Times)

Anton Kusters (BBC World Service Outlook program) ‘Belgian photographer who documented the lives of a Japanese Yakuza crime syndicate’

Olivier Laurent interviewed Getty Reportage’s Sebastian Liste, who has come a long way in just over two years…. In Perpignan, he picked up the City of Perpignan Remi Ochlik Award and a Getty Editorial Grant….

Photo © Sebastian Liste

Sebastian Liste, From the Ian Parry Scholarship to Reportage by Getty Images (BJP)

Stefano De Luigi (Emaho Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz, Taking My Time (YouTube)

Justin Jin interviewed about his project that got exhibited at this year’s Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Justin Jin

Justin Jin, The Zone of Absolute Discomfort (BJP)

Tracey Shelton (DSLR News Shooter) ‘Death in Syria – how Globalpost’s Tracey Shelton captured her extraordinary images’

The New Economics of Photojournalism: The Death of Once Magazine (BJP) ‘The magazine’s editor, John Knight, tells BJP what went wrong’

Corbis Images’ Ken Johnston, Protecting an iconic image (Reuters blog)

Lauren Greenfield.
Photo © Larry Busacca / Getty

Lauren Greenfield (Guardian) ‘The photographer and film-maker on the lovable billionaires in her new documentary, and the state of the American Dream’

Lauren Greenfield (GQ)

Annie Leibovitz (Youtube)

Bruce Gilden (Daylight)

Davide Monteleone (World Press Photo)

Cover photo © Gregory Heisler

Gregory Heisler (A Photo Editor)

One Problem with Running Your Own Photo Agency: It Takes a Lot of Time (PDN)

Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

Abe Frajndlich Tells of Photographing a Difficult Annie Leibovitz (Featureshoot)

Amanda Rivkin (NatGeo)

David Goldblatt (Source Magazine Oral History Archive)

Lisa Pritchard, Ask and Agent, Photography Rates for Advertorial Usage (LPA)

Damir Sagolj, 7 Photojournalism Tips by Reuters Photographer (Vimeo)

Sandy Huffaker Jr., gives us his tips on how to take beautiful street shots (Manfrotto)

Markéta Luskačová‘s best photograph: Ginger the musician (Guardian)

Series of interviews on the National Portrait Gallery website with photographers commissioned to take portraits of British Olympians…

Photo © Nadav Kander

Nadav Kander (NPG) Road to 2012

Bettina von Zwehl (NPG) Road to 2012

Brian Griffin (NPG) Road to 2012

Finlay Mackay (NPG) Road to 2012

Jillian Edelstein (NPG) Road to 2012

Anderson & Low (NPG) Road to 2012

Emma Hardy (NPG) Road to 2012

To finish off…. Calvin and Hobbes on truth and photography 

Written by Mikko Takkunen

September 24, 2012 at 7:51 pm

Interview: Nicole Tung on covering the battle for Aleppo

Earlier this month, TIME published A Syrian Tragedy: One Family’s Horror, a series of images shot by freelance photographer Nicole Tung. The images, shot in Aleppo as the Syrian city was under attack, portray civil casualties, highlighting how the war has torned apart families. For the past four months, Nicole has been documenting the uprising in Syria. Months before, she was in Libya, covering her first violent conflict at just 25.

Nicole started taking pictures when she was 15, living in Hong Kong, her hometown. “A good friend of mine, who also became a photographer, also served as one of my inspirations,” she says. “He showed me the first book in contemporary photojournalism that I clearly remember today, Winterreise by Luc Delahaye.” She studied journalism and history at New York University, and has since been published by The New York Times, TIME and Global Post among many other magazines and newspapers.

In an interview with Photojournalism Links, she tells us more about her work in Syria, how she gained access to the country and what she’s seen there.

Men carry the body of Hatem Qureya, 15, after he was trapped under rubble following an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Hatem later died at the field hospital. His father, mother, younger brother and sister and two younger cousins were also killed. Bustan al Qasr, a Free Syrian Army controlled district in south west Aleppo, has consistently been shelled and attacked by helicopters and planes over the last two weeks after the FSA entered Syria’s commercial capital and its most populated city. According to the UN, over 200,000 civilians have fled the city, whilst many other displaced remain inside, seeking refuge in mosques, parks, and schools. Bustan al Qasr remains almost fully populated by its residents who chose not to flee. Image © Nicole Tung.

Mikko Takkunen and Olivier Laurent: Why did you decide to go to Syria?

Nicole Tung: I decided to go to Syria because I felt that the coverage was lacking from the inside. But I was also personally curious and I wanted to fulfill something that the late Marie Colvin once said: “Our mission is to report these horrors of war with accuracy and without prejudice.” Marie was a friend and I felt that her death could not, should not, cow journalists from carrying out their missions. She would have been disappointed to know that her death was the reason so many decided to turn off from directly covering Syria. I admired her deeply, and felt the best way to honor her, and other colleagues killed in the past year was to continue working.

MT & OL: How did you manage to enter the country?

NT: I entered the country through Turkey, like many journalists do. Up until a few weeks ago, all the crossings in to Syria via Turkey had to be illegal. It involved some running across border areas with gear in hand, to avoid the Turkish military police.

MT & OL: How did you make your way to Aleppo?

NT: I first went to Aleppo city a week before the fighting began on July 20. I was in the Reef Aleppo (the country side), spending time in the towns there that were experiencing frequent helicopter and shelling attacks by the government forces. At that time, Aleppo was still in full control of the military, intelligence, and police units and getting in meant sneaking through back roads, avoiding the plentiful checkpoints, and high tailing it in to a safe house in the city. One could not really work as a photographer in Aleppo just four weeks ago– spies were everywhere and you were busy focusing on not sticking out, so having a camera in public, even out in the car, was absolutely out of the question.

The brother of Abdul Latif Qureya, 33, reads the Koran near his body after he was killed in an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Abdul Latif Qureya’s wife Wahiba, two sons, Hatem, 15, and Mahmoud, 14, and his 8-year-old daughter Bara’a as well as a neice, 7, and nephew, 1, were killed in the same airstrike. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Was sending your work back to your editors a struggle? How did you manage it?

NT: When I went back to Aleppo as the fighting started, sending work back to editors was and is, certainly a struggle. Many of the activists there were caught off guard, I think, by the actual fighting having finally reached Aleppo. I saw a steady decline in the quality of communications over a three-week period. Phone networks in the city started to fail, and the 3G Internet the activists often relied on began to shut down too, besides the fact that it was very difficult to buy credit. Only a few, highly skilled activists could set up satellite Internet quickly enough, or run DSL connections out of still-government controlled areas of the city. Added to that was the severe electricity cuts that about 70% of the city was experiencing. I managed to send images out because of the Syrians, who would often go to the ends of the Earth to help me. They worked tirelessly to get a car, to get fuel for the car, to make sure the roads were safe, then worked to get you to a physical location in order to connect to the Internet. And then they stayed with you, drank tea and coffee with you, for hours on end while your files were beamed halfway across the world. It is a cumbersome way, but often the only way, to work in Syria. I have never experienced such patience and generosity from people who are themselves going through the darkest hours of their life.

MT & OL: Where you working with other photographers/journalists while there?

NT: I was working with one other videographer whilst I was there. It’s difficult to work in Syria in big groups because of the logistics. Also, in a dangerous situation, having too many opinions from too many colleagues often causes more problems.

MT & OL: Did you have an assignment before you left for Syria or were you confident you were going to get published once you were in the country?

NT: The first time I went into Syria at the end of May this year, I did not have an assignment. I was there to establish contacts and get a better idea of what things looked like on the ground. I went back several times, selling images to various publications before getting an assignment in June to go back in with Die Zeit. When I was not on assignment — I want to say I was confident, but in those situations you just never know — I knew for a fact that there were very few journalists covering Syria from the inside because of the dangers it posed and for logistical reasons. I thought that having a view from the ground might be somewhat valuable in itself.

Demonstrators shout slogans as they carry the bodies of nine civilians killed the night before by mortars fired on the city of Maarat Al Noman by the Syrian Army on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Estimates put the death toll between 20-30 people as many died on their way to Turkey for further medical treatment, and over 100 people were injured. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Your work for TIME in Aleppo has received particular attention. Can you tell us about your experience on the ground in Aleppo?

NT: I witnessed the situation in Aleppo both before and after the fight for the city began on July 20. It was incredible to see the changes because the neighborhoods which are experiencing the heaviest fighting now, and which have been hardest hit, were the most defiant in terms of staging almost nightly demonstrations against the government even in a very tightly controlled city. When I first went there, checkpoints had been set up on all the main arteries of Aleppo. I moved around with doctors and activists who took incredible risks to do their jobs and added more risk by having a foreign journalist in their car. I couldn’t have my camera out at all, because there were pro-government militias known as ‘shebiha’ all around, and informers for the regime, as well. The only time I could take my camera out briefly was when I was at the demonstrations, running the risk that the protest would be broken up at any given time if the security forces open fired on the crowd, which they did very often.

I saw the Aleppo Underground as it was. There were doctors clandestinely treating injured protestors at private and sometimes public hospitals, and falsifying their medical reports (taking care not to write ‘gun shot wound’ or any other violence related injuries) to avoid scrutiny by security. There were pharmacists shuttling medical supplies in and out of the city to other affected areas around the country. Women who left the comfort of their middle-upper class life to deliver clothes, food, and formula to families who sought refuge in Aleppo from places like Homs and Hamah. One woman even counseled girls who had been raped. There were teenagers, all high school students, who dared to protest and were arrested, often tortured before being released and they were back on the streets the very next day protesting again. And then there were the Aleppo University students who became the heart of the uprising in city, through their shows of multiple, daily demonstrations in front of their faculties. They paid a high price for it, often getting beaten, shot at, and arrested by the security forces on campus. No less than one dozen students were killed on university grounds over the months of protests, and in June 2012, three medical students were found bound, shot, and their bodies burned for attempting to treat an injured protestor. The revolution was very much alive, and it was conducted almost completely through peaceful means. But finally, the war came to Aleppo, and since then, overcrowded neighborhoods have become ghost towns, the chatter and noise of daily life and children has given way to the sound of incoming mortar rounds, tank shells, the drone of helicopters and furious sound of diving fighter jets. Shelling in the contested areas of the city has no pattern and it is indiscriminate, often hitting civilians in their own homes. The Free Syrian Army has continued to pour in to the city. They have the advantage of knowing the streets and urban warfare is their forte. But they still lack weapons to make any real gain on the government forces. Civilians in some neighborhoods have fled to other parts of the city, to parks, university dormitories, and mosques whilst others have gone to Aleppo’s countryside. Some families have been displaced twice over as they left Hamah and Homs, only to be leaving their refuge in Aleppo. That was my experience in Aleppo: the situation was fluid, and working around it was incredibly difficult.

MT & OL: You concentrated a lot more on civilians rather than FSA fighters. Was this something you had decided beforehand or did it just happen?

NT: I did not decide beforehand that I would cover specifically civilians, but it became very apparent to me, once I was there, that it was necessary. The war is fought by two sides with particular, sometimes varying, agendas. Photographing combat is dangerously addictive to some people. I have a one-day tolerance for it when I’m there before I find that most of those images end up looking the same and provide little scope for what else is happening. Certainly the FSA is up against a violently disproportionate use of weapons but the civilians are the quiet sufferers of what happens on the battlefield. Assad’s forces don’t hesitate to kill them if they peacefully demonstrate or harbor FSA fighters in their neighborhoods. Often, the FSA base themselves there to try and protect the civilian population or use it as a point from which to attack the Syrian Army. But it’s the civilians who pay the price because they lose their lives and lose their homes. Sometimes there’s no reason at all for killing civilians. The worst is seeing children getting injured, or dying. For what, though? When I witnessed an airstrike last week that killed five children from the same family, it occurred to me that it was something beyond comprehension, beyond reason. At that point, agendas don’t matter at all.

Men gather at a graveyard on the outskirts of Anadan, Syria, on Friday, June 8, 2012 to bury Fawaz Omar Abdullah, 30, a civilian who was shot and killed by a Syrian Army sniper the day before as he was walking near a checkpoint in the village. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: How widely have your images been published?

NT: Certainly the advantage of having published with TIME is that many people see those images, and I have the editors there to thank for their support when I was working in an extremely difficult situation. They have since gone on to CNN, Human Rights Watch, Paris Match, other European publications and will also be screened at Visa Pour l’Image in September.

MT & OL: How different was covering Syria compared to Libya?

NT: Syria is far more dangerous and complicated than anything I ever experienced in Libya. Libya was the first combat zone I’d ever been to and I was lucky to have so many veteran journalists around who looked out for me and guided us younger photographers. We also shared rides with them and listened to (or more correctly, noted) their advice, followed them as they worked, and learned from them. I was fortunate to have security consultants lend me body armor and give me crash courses in first aid. Syria has none of those luxuries. I’ve since picked up my own body armor, took a combat medical training course, and made a fair number of my own contacts inside. You are on your own from beginning to end, and you cannot rely on anyone but yourself. The government’s use of fire power is unlimited. At least there was a no-fly zone very quickly established in Libya, but in Syria, anything goes. The people of Libya and Syria are not so different, though. I have met some of the most generous, warm hearted people working in both countries and their hospitality often knows no bounds.

MT & OL: Now that you are out of the country, what are your plans? Are you going back? Or will it prove difficult to go back?

NT: I will continue to go back to Syria because, like Libya, I have become committed to the story and the path of where the country will go. It will prove difficult going back only because of people’s concerns about my safety, which I certainly understand.

MT & OL: How do you see the situation evolving in Syria in the coming weeks?

NT: In the coming weeks, the fight for Aleppo will still be going on. The rebels there are no match to the forces of Assad, especially when they continuously run low on ammunition. The country is already in chaos when you think about how many millions are displaced by fighting, how many thousands of lives have been lost, and the amount of destruction this war has wrought, physically, financially, and emotionally. Added to that is the lack of unity from both political and military groups from the opposition. While Damascus and Aleppo become the biggest news stories, other cities near Idlib and Hamah continue to get pounded by government forces. And let’s say Assad were to be finished off tomorrow, what will a new government look like? Will minority groups be proportionately represented? And what about the regional implications of this war? These are all questions the Syrians are still wrestling with. Most don’t have answers that would satisfy the international community.

Nicole Tung’s images can be seen on TIME’s Lightbox here and here.

For more information about Nicole Tung, visit her website at www.nicoletung.com.

Written by Olivier Laurent

August 16, 2012 at 12:56 pm

Interviews and Talks | August 2012

Stephanie Sinclair (CNN) Interviewed about her child brides project by CNN’s Christina Amanpour

Aaron Huey (Media Bistro) ‘National Geographic’s Aaron Huey on Digital Collaboration and Community Storytelling’

Photo © Philip Blenkinsop

Gary Knight (FotoEvidence)

Andre Liohn (YouTube) The Robert Capa Gold Medal award speech

Michael Kamber (NYT Lens) on Witnessess to War book

David Turnley (CNN) ‘New doc ‘Shenandoah’ tells story of undocumented immigrant killed by teens’

Don McCullin (BBC) Desert Island Discs 1984

Photo © Alexandra Avakian

Jean-Francois Leroy (BJP) Visa pour l’Image director Jean-Francois Leroy interviewed by our very own Olivier Laurent!

Luke Sharrett (Photo Brigade) ‘Traveling Aboard Air Force One’

Luke Sharrett (PDN) “The College Kid Whose Obama Photo Landed in The New Yorker”

James Estrin (burn)

The Bystanders: photographers who didn’t step in to help (Guardian) “What’s it like to witness a mob attack, a starving child or the aftermath of a bomb, and take a photograph instead of stopping to help? As two journalists are under fire for recording rather than intervening in a sex attack in India, we ask people who know”

Lauren Greenfield  (Phoenix.com) on The Queen of Versailles

Photo © Martin Parr

Martin Parr (Ideas Tap) Parr on Abstract painting with abstract shirt

Steve McCurry (Ideas Tap ) McCurry on ‘Dust Storm, Rajasthan, India’

Alex Webb (PDN) Webb on His Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

Stanley Greene (PDN) Greene on Luck, Film and Supporting Young Photographers

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman, Mark Power and Stuart Franklin (IdeasTap)  ‘Magnum photographers on their craft ‘

Edward Burtynsky (Metro)  Burtynsky: “Photographers’ Gallery will be an exciting new space”

Robin Hammond (nzherald.co.nz) ‘The Zimbabwe Mugabe didn’t want you to see’

Jacob Aue Sobol : Arrivals and Departures pt6 (Leica blog)

Josef Koudelka (Vogue.it)

Jodi Bieber (Ted.com)

Tewfic El-Sawy (Auto de Fe)

Lucas Foglia (Guardian) ‘photographer in search of off-the-grid Americans’

Mark Seliger in conversation with Platon and Dylan McDermott (Capture: episode 1 on YouTube)

Jonathan Torgovnik (FK Magazine)

John Cantlie (DailyBeast) “Journalist John Cantlie Learned How Deadly Syria Can Be When He Was Held Hostage by Jihadis”

John Cantlie (Channel 4 News) Cantlie about having been held captive in Syria

Bruce Gilden (Magnum Photos blog)

Jonas Bendiksen (Leica Vimeo)

Photo © Kate Peters

Kate Peters (Hasselblad blog) ‘Kate Peters and her trusty Hasselblad have just completed a marathon project to photograph an impressive line up of Olympic hopefuls for a huge spread in The Guardian’s Weekend supplement.’

Al Bello (NYT) ‘To Get the Shot, Nerve, Luck and Scuba Gear’

Doug Mills (NYT Lens) ‘Photographing the Olympics: The 400-Millimeter Dash’

Tony Hicks, AP’s regional photo editor for Europe and Africa (AP) Men’s 100m final “As well as 18 photographers, AP had 20 remote cameras placed in every imaginable shooting position.”

Photo © David Burnett / Contact Press Images

David Burnett (NYT Lens) ‘An Olympic Photographer’s Endurance’

Gregory Bull (Youtube) ‘AP Photographer Gregory Bull shot one of the iconic images of the London Games Thursday. He explains how he got that magical shot of Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas high over the balance beam.’

Jonathan Klein (CNN video posted on Photo Archive News) ‘Getty Images CEO Jonathan Klein on Getty’s involvement in London 2012′

Photos © Martin Schoeller

Martin Schoeller (BBC) “Photographer Martin Schoeller searches for the unique in identical twins”

Kate Holt (Action Aid)

Gareth Cattermole (YouTube) “Gareth Cattermole is a Getty Images staff entertainment photographer”

Palani Mohan (Asia Society) ‘Photographer Documents Rugged Lives of Kazakh Eagle Hunters’

Ewen Spencer (We Heart)

Chloe Dewe Mathews (Picture Perfect  | Vice.com)

Diver and Aguilar (A Photo Editor)

Sean Hemmerle (PDN) ‘How Sean Hemmerle Photographed Drones’

WassinkLundgren (Unseen Amsterdam)

Stephen Wilkes (A Photo Editor)

Photo © Martin Roemers

Martin Roemers (theurbn.com)

Chris Gregory (NYT Lens)

Newsha Tavakolian (Leica blog)

Brent Lewin (Boreal Collective)

James Noble (Guardian) ‘Tetra Pak heir: how photographer snapped key shots’

Steve Giralt (Photographer’s blog)  ‘The Best Photography Course I Ever Took’

Richard Koci Hernandez (LA Times Framework blog)

Written by Mikko Takkunen

August 14, 2012 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Interviews

Interviews and Talks | 3 July 2012

This is really fascinating… David Burnett writing about the moment he missed taking a picture of the ‘napalm girl’ due to having to change film….

Photo © David Burnett

David Burnett : ‘Forty years after ‘napalm girl’ picture, a photographer reflects on the moment that might have been his’ (Washington Post)

Photo © Alex Webb

Alex Webb (NYT Magazine 6th floor blog)

Bruce Davidson (TateShots on YouTube)

Steve McCurry (Al Jazeera interview video posted on Phaidon)

Steve McCurry  (Phaidon)

Ed Kashi (Vimeo)

Paid my first visit to the recently re-opened Photographers’ Gallery in London’s Soho on Saturday to see the Burtynsky exhibition. Amazing to see those 8×10 large format photos printed big….

Photo © Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky (The Atlantic)

Ron Haviv : The Complete Travel Took Kit (VII Magazine)

Inside Media: Photographers of the Year with Damon Winter, Adrees Latif, and Barbara Davidson (2011) (Newseum’s YouTube) 40 mins.

Randy Olson : Easter Island Kite Camera (photothisandthat.co.uk) 5 mins

Elizabeth Krist : National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor  : ‘What Photo Buyers Want’ (Photoshelter Vimeo) 65 mins

Alexandra Avakian (NGM)

Paula James : Panos Pictures (IdeasTap)

Magnum photographers on their craft  (IdeasTap)

Tomas van Houtryve : 2012 Oslo Freedom Forum (YouTube) 10 mins

Brigitte Lacombe (Charlie Rose)

Afghan photographers shoot to glory (Al Jazeera)

For a person who often says ‘I don’t care about the equipment’, I sure am eager to read about others’ gear…

Marcus Yam : In My Bag (Photo Brigade)

Luke Sharrett : In My Bag (Photo Brigade)

Nadav Kander (YouTube)

Nadav Kander : How to Create an Unforgettable Portrait (Fastcocreate.com)

Matt Lutton (Wired Raw File blog)

Abbey Trayler-Smith (WalesOnline)

Kira Pollack (Vimeo)

Chris Buck (A Photo Editor)

Photo © John Vink

John Vink (Verve Photo)

Lynsey Stone : Birth Photographer (NYT)

Daniel Reimold: 10 Tips for Photojournalism Students: How to Succeed Visually and Financially (Photo Brigade)

“She looks like a person who will die one day.”

- Thomas Struth on his commission to photograph The Queen.

Photo © Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth : Queen’s Diamond Jubilee: interview with a royal portrait artist (Telegraph)

Annie Leibovitz : The Monarchy (YouTube) Edited version from the BBC Documentary on the Queen, Leibovitz’s struggle to capture the Monarchy.

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam Part 9 (Nikon blog)

Photo © Adam Pretty

Adam Pretty (Time Out Australia)

David Stuart : Still Images In Great Advertising (A Photo Editor)

Kurt Markus : The Portrait : Find Your Voice (A Photo Editor)

Not a photographer interview but interesting…

Michael Ware (Newsweek)

Written by Mikko Takkunen

July 3, 2012 at 6:30 pm

Interviews and Talks | 7 June 2012

The Afrikaner Blood ©  Ilvy Njiokiktjien and Elles van Gelder.
World Press Photo 2012 contest Multimedia Prize winner.

World Press Photo 2012 Contest Winners interviewed (World Press Photo)

Jamie, Wellford, Newsweek‘s Senior International photo editor (PhotoShelter)

Stephen Shore (Phaidon)

Ben Lowy (ICP Vimeo)

Ben Lowy (NYT Lens)

Photo ©  Jacob Aue Sobol

Jacob Aue Sobol : Arrivals and Departures pt1,  pt2 , pt3, pt4, pt5 (Leica blog)

VII photographers in conversation at the Frontline (Phaidon)

Stephen Mayes (Phaidon)

Stephen Mayes (Pictureline)

Tom Stoddart, Peter Dench and Aidan Sullivan, Reportage by Getty Images at Frontline Club (Reportage Tumblr)

James Nachtwey (The Darthmouth.com)

Joachim Ladefoged (A Photo Editor)

Charles Ommanney (itele.fr)

Photo  ©  Jason P. Howe / ConflictPics

Jason P. Howe (FotoEvidence)

Yuri Kozyrev (PDN)

Ashley Gilbertson (PDN)

Peter Dench (PDN)

Robin Hammond (allAfrica.com)

Susan Meiselas (burn)

Alex Webb (Vogue)

Rene Burri (Phaidon)

Rene Burri (Phaidon)

David Burnett (ThaloTV)

Annie Leibovitz (Guardian)

Joao Silva (Dcist)

JR (Ted)

Pieter Hugo (Guernica)

Mitch Epstein (BBC)

Photo © Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi (Guardian)

Ed Kashi (Vimeo)

In the Picture: 25 Years of Panos Pictures (Frontline Club YouTube)

Carolyn Drake (Turkiye’de Zaman)

Vanessa Winship (Turkiye’de Zaman)

George Georgiou (Turkiye’de Zaman)

Chris de Bode (Dutch TV)

Pete Muller, Brief Reflections on OPC Awards Ceremony (Photographer’s blog)

Photo © Andrea Gjestvang

Andrea Gjestvang (B&H)

Dana Popa (BBC)

Dana Popa (Foto8)

Nicole Tung (NYT Lens)

Laura El-Tantawy (Dvafoto)

Ciara Leeming (Centrepoint Collective)

Laura Pannack (Ideas Tap)

Lee Karen Stow (BBC)

GMB Akash (123Clicks)

Rafal Milach (rbth.ru)

Photo © Simon Roberts

Photographers Abbie Trayler-Smith, Carol Allen Storey, Liz Hingley, Simon Roberts and Laura Pannack discuss their work in the Our Lives photography series about children living in the UK commissioned by Save the Children. (Save the Children YouTube)

James Nachtwey, 2009 (YouTube)

Frits van Eldik (CPN)

Diver & Aguilar (luxurysociety.com)

John Fulton (featureshoot)

Edward Linsmier (4ormat.com)

Written by Mikko Takkunen

June 7, 2012 at 1:02 am

Posted in Interviews

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