Side by Side | ICRC Centre Kabul by Yuri Kozyrev 2012 and James Nachtwey 2009

TIME just posted Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Afghanistan on Lightbox, under the title ‘Afghanistan Now’, some of which is featured in this week’s print issue, dated 11 June 2012 to accompany Aryn Baker’s article  on President Hamid Karzai headlined ‘On His Own’.

Frame 14 in the Kozyrev’s  slideshow from ICRC orthophedic centre in Kabul gave a me flashback to a James Nachtwey frame from the same place taken in 2009 for an ICRC campaign to mark their 150th anniversary.

Many similarities in the photographs, but looking at them side-by-side and seeing two amputees from different generations also provides a pretty sad reflexion of not just an issue continuing to face the people of Afghanistan but perhaps the state of the country in wider sense.

Orthophedic center of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Kabul.
Left: © Yuri Kozyrev, 2012.
Right: ©  James Nachtwey, 2009.

Written by Mikko Takkunen

June 4, 2012 at 2:48 pm

Posted in Side-by-Side

Tearsheet of the Day | 3 June 2012

Anders Petersen did a commission in London’s Soho for The Photographers’ Gallery which re-opened in the very same neighbourhood end of May.

The Sunday Times Magazine has ran some photos from Petersen’s series in the magazine’s Spectrum section today.

Text on the spread: Toe’s Company. The Swedish photographer Anders Petersen first witnessed the seedy side of Soho in the 1970s. Now he has returned to document London’s most colourful neighbourhood – and see how’s it’s changed. Commissioned by the Photographers’ Gallery, he immersed himself in Soho life for a month, capturing these grainy black-and-white portraits in homes, hotels, and bars. Some are simple snapshots of intriguing subjects – boozers, bohemians or both. Others are more considered, with Petersen befriending people who live and work in the small, vibrant district at the heart of the capital. 

You can see some of the photos also on Guardian’s website, here.

Anders Petersen’s (b.1944, Sweden) personal website.

Written by Mikko Takkunen

June 3, 2012 at 7:23 pm

Posted in tear sheets, Tearsheets

Image of the Month – Dominic Nahr for TIME

This image  from Sudan (used here with the photographer’s permission), which portrays a soldier of the northern regime’s army, the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF), dead, immersed in oil next to a leaking petroleum facility in Heglig, was taken by Magnum Photos member Dominic Nahr for TIME. The magazine ran it double truck end of April to open Alex Perry’s article titled Sudan’s Spiral Back to War. When Mikko and I saw it, we agreed it was one of the most visually and contextually striking images we’d seen in weeks – and so, it made sense for us to select it to kickstart our new monthly showcase.

Writing for TIME, Dominic explained how he came to photograph this dead soldier. “In Heglig, days before it was retaken by the northern army, I wandered over to the nearby oil installations hoping to capture photos of the destruction. There were bodies of dead northern soldiers all over the place. As I got closer to the pipeline I saw a corpse lying in a thick slick of oil, glistening in the sun. The soldier’s head was resting on his arms and I couldn’t see any injuries: it looked like he was sleeping.” Read more about it on the TIME Lightbox website.

We’ve asked Dominic to share with Photojournalism Links his personal feelings about the image. He had this to say: “When I see civilians that have been killed, my body aches, knowing that something horrible has happened. With soldiers it is slightly different. I had been photographing more than a dozen bodies that day, most of which were torn to pieces. You go into work mode, I remember I was photographing this body that almost didn’t look real, I framed it in a very direct way. When I got back to look at it I was shocked to see that I thought that would be an ok picture to have published or shown. It was very far from being useable. When I saw the body in the oil, i really thought the soldier looked like he was sleeping, so in a way it was a lot more calming than the other situations I had documented that day. It felt like for the moment I was there, time stopped.”

Written by Olivier Laurent

June 1, 2012 at 3:01 pm

Photo Editor of the Month: Emma Bowkett of FT Weekend Magazine

As part of Photojournalism Links’s relaunch, we’re introducing new and regular columns, with the goal of exploring further the inner-workings of the photojournalism community. One such column is dedicated to Photo Editors. Far from being a Hall of Fame-type of chronicle, it’s a way for us to introduce photo editors that are using photography in intelligent and creative ways. We’re also mindful that a lot of our readers are students and emerging photographers, who might not always know how photo editors work and how, and when, they can be approached. Hopefully, this column will help them, while informing others about the work of particular photo editors.

This month, we’re starting with Emma Bowkett, the photo editor for the Financial Times Weekend Magazine.

Photo © Kalpesh Lathigra.

Photojournalism Links: How did you get started in photography? How did you end up being a photo editor for Financial Times?

Emma Bowkett: Graduating from Goldsmiths College in 2005 with an MA in Image and Communication, I took an internship at the Victoria & Albert Museum, archiving prints for their Word and Image department. Then I worked for two years as first assistant to an advertising photographer, before teaching on the degree course at Goldsmiths. This was a term-time position, so I started freelance picture editing at the Financial Times. I developed a good working relationship with the art director on the FT Weekend Magazine. She kept asking me back.

Photojournalism Links: How do you use photography for the FT Weekend Magazine?

Emma Bowkett: We re-launched the magazine in 2010 with greater emphasis on photography. Most of the photography in the magazine is commissioned. We are a weekly publication with a short lead-time. Stories are often timed to events and news stories, so we are able to commission photographers to work on assignments, as well as publishing photo essays, previews of photo exhibitions and books. I work closely with the AD’s, photographers and agents to produce concepts. Ideas are pitched to my editor, and usually run over six or eight pages. We are encouraged to be ambitious with both images and design.

Photojournalism Links: What are you looking for in the photographers that you use? What attracts you to a certain photographer over another?

Emma Bowkett: I’m looking for photographers with a sense of authorship to their work. I see a lot of folios, sometimes there’s just a special something that attracts me.

Photojournalism Links: Do you mostly use to local photographers for international assignments? Are there cases, when you would send someone abroad?

Emma Bowkett: Much of the photography I commission is international. I usually work with photographers on the ground. That said, there are circumstances where we fly someone in, if we are looking for a specific style [we’ll] use a specific photographer.

Photojournalism Links: How do you discover new photographers?

Emma Bowkett: Galleries, social media sites, magazines, blogs, agents, recommendations. I try to see two photographers’ books a week because I like talking to photographers about their personal projects face to face when I can. Attending private views, talks, and events are a good way to meet new photographers and build relationships.

Photojournalism Links: Are there one or several photographers that have impressed you in the past year? And why?

Emma Bowkett: I am continually impressed by photography. There are several photographers I could mention; many are regular contributors to the magazine. I’d like to mention Stan Douglas, who I recently discovered, and is this year’s recipient of ICP’s Infinity Award for Art. He recently exhibited in London and in New York. We ran his series, Midcentury Studio, in the magazine.  I was lucky enough to see both shows. I’m interested in his concept of taking on the identity of a photojournalist, constructing scenes and narratives, challenging fact and fiction. I really love his work.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

Photojournalism Links: What is the last photo book that you’ve bought?

Emma Bowkett: I have just bought WassinkLundgren’s Empty Bottles and Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs.

Photojournalism Links: If you could hire any photographer, who would it be?

Emma Bowkett: I was just in contact with Sølve Sundsbø’s agent about a possible cover shoot. It didn’t work out, but I’d still like to work with him. I have a wish list of photographers. The best thing about my job is working with photographers I admire.

Photojournalism Links: What are your hobbies outside of photography?

Emma Bowkett: I go to the movies as much as I can. I cycle and go the gym.

Photojournalism Links: How can photographers reach you?

Emma Bowkett: Email, Twitter or Facebook. The same way I find them.

Written by Olivier Laurent

May 30, 2012 at 9:50 am

Tearsheet of the Day | 25 May 2012

Ed Ou on the front page of the International Herald Tribune (Europe edition) today with a photo from the village of Tannourine in Lebanon for an article  about Iran trying to increase its influence over the country. Iran has for instance offered to build a dam in Tannourine, an idea that hasn’t pleased everybody in the solidly Christian village. You can read the article here.  Obvious symbolism with the cross on the foreground, but I think it really works, making a photo of an otherwise seemingly unremarkable scene interesting. Certainly caught and pleased my eyes.

Photo by Ed Ou for the New York Times

Caption in the newspaper: Tannourine, Lebanon, site of a proposed dam to be built with Iranian money. Many residents of the mainly Christian area are wary of Tehran’s effort to widen its influence in the country.

Ed Ou (b.1987, Canada) is represented by Reportage by Getty Images. His portfolio on the agency’s website. You can follow Ou on Twitter here.

Written by Mikko Takkunen

May 25, 2012 at 5:29 pm

Posted in tear sheets, Tearsheets

Tearsheet of the Day | 24 May 2012

Received National Geographic Magazine’s June issue in the mail this morning. Includes David Alan Harvey’s brilliant series ‘OBX’ on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, that I was admiring already in last week’s Features and Essays. Great to see this in print. The online series is available on NGM Feature Hub here, but do check out the print copy. Always better.

Photo by David Alan Harvey

Caption in the magazine: “Do you need a fish that bad?” I shouted at this boy as he repeatedly cast a line into the heaving sea. “Do you need a photo that bad?” he shouted back. We ended up agreeing that we were both a little crazy for being out on the Nags Head during a nor ‘easter.

David Alan Harvey (b.1944, USA) has been Magnum member since 1997. Portfolio on the agency’s website.

Written by Mikko Takkunen

May 24, 2012 at 4:17 pm

Posted in tear sheets, Tearsheets

Tearsheet of the Day | 23 May 2012

In celebration of the Egypt’s first free presidential elections, today’s tearsheet is a Moises Saman double spread from Cairo in the latest Newsweek Int’l dated 28 May 2012. The photo opens Dan Ephron’s article ‘The Irresistible Islamist’.

Photo by Moises Saman / Magnum

Caption in the magazine: Egyptians go to the polls this week.

You can see the photo also in a  slideshow on Newsweek here.

Moises Saman is currently covering the presidential elections for The New York Times. A slideshow, ‘Egypt’s Choice’,  was posted on NYT website two days ago.

His November 2011 series ‘Cairo Undone’ on the New York Times, narrated by the late Anthony Shadid is really worth having a look if you haven’t seen it before.

Moises Saman (b.1974, Peru) is a Magnum nominee. His portfolio on the agency’s website. You can follow Saman on Twitter here.

Written by Mikko Takkunen

May 23, 2012 at 12:17 pm

Posted in tear sheets, Tearsheets


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