P H O T O J O U R N A L I S M L I N K S

Wednesday 18 August 2010

Features and Essays – Magnum Photos: Where Artists and Writers Live and Work (Slate: August 2010)

Features and Essays – New Yorker Photo Booth: The Road Back to New Orleans (work by Stanley Greene and Kadir van Lohuizen) (New Yorker: August 2010)

Features and Essays – Irina Kalashnikova: North Korea (Reportage by Getty Images: August 2010) Kalashnikova’s website

Features and Essays – NYT Magazine: Documenting the Life of 20-Somethings (NYT Mag: August 2010) 13 young photographers document their generation using iPhones

Features and Essays – Stefano di Luigi: Kenya Drought (VII Magazine August 2010)

Features and Essays – Ian Teh: Dark Clouds [multimedia] (Panos Pictures: August 2010) China

Features and Essays – Robin Hammond: As I See It (Panos Pictures: August 2010)

Features and Essays – Tomas Munita: A Workers’ Revolt Endures in Peru (NYT: August 2010)

Features and Essays – Gareth Phillips: Rogue Tailor Needles Savile Row, Gets Himself a (Law)Suit (WSJ: August 2010)

Features and Essays – Joseph Rodriguez: Personal Violence (Visura: August 2010)

Agencies – Stockland Martel : website : blog

Interviews and TalksEd Kashi : A Photographer’s Journey Near and Far (FORA.tv: August 2010)

Interviews Charlie Mahoney (BJP: August 2010)

InterviewsRobert Caplin (NYT Lens: August 2010)

InterviewsSteve Peck -Picture Editor, Wired Magazine (Professional Photographer: 2010)

InterviewsJames Mullinger – Photo Editor, GQ Magazine (Professional Photographer: 2010)

Photographers Benjamin Rasmussen

PhotographersNatalie Behring

PhotographersLuca Tronci

PhotographersLuca Sola

PhotographersCharlotte Kesl

TwitterJason Andrew

Awards Magnum Expression Award : Deadline August 31 2010

Awards BJP International Photography : September 30 2010

AwardsTerry O’Neill Award : Deadline October 22 2010

Time for a little rant…

Photo: Daniel Berehulak / Getty Images

There have been a lot of complaints that the international community’s response to the devastating Pakistan floods has been inadequate. It got me thinking of the response and reaction of the Western photojournalism community, more specifically from publishers and photographers. Of course the initial death toll caused by the Pakistan floods is nothing compared to the Haiti earthquake, but its repercussions are in a sense bigger, with 6 million people in desperate need of emergency aid according to the UN. Now I remember, as I’m sure everyone does, how photographers  – both media and self- assigned – rushed to Haiti to cover the earthquake aftermath, but I haven’t seen anything even remotely close to that kind of reaction and response as a result of the Pakistan floods. I wonder why that might be?  After the Haiti earthquake struck, TIME magazine immediately sent two photographers there, Shaul Schwarz and Timothy Fadek, whose work was shown prominently  in a daily updated photo gallery on the magazine’s website, and a week into the aftermath they also dispatched James Nachtwey. I just had a look at TIME’s photo essays page on their website, and there is only one single Pakistan floods gallery, published on August 2, which is made up of photographs taken by EPA, AP, Reuters, and Getty Images photographers. And New York Times, who sent several of their own staffers, including Damon Winter,  and regular freelancers to Haiti, has opted not to send anyone of their own to Pakistan, instead publishing several photo galleries (here, here, and here) made up entirely of wire photographs. So there are photographers on the ground and of course NYT has to be congratulated for publishing some of the work, but I would argue that if a newspaper or a magazine is committed to seriously covering an issue, like both TIME and NYT did in Haiti, they will assign their own photographers. And I would argue that one can potentially receive a more comprehensive view of a catastrophic situation such as the Pakistan floods, at least photographically, by looking at larger bodies of work each done by single observers. I tend to overlook those photo galleries made up of several photographers’ work, those ‘wire galleries’ as I call them, no matter how good the work in them might be – as in the case of Getty’s Daniel Berehulak whose always terrific photos can be seen as part of the only TIME Pakistan floods gallery – and preferring to see work comprising a singular vision such as Alixandra Fazzina’s flood photos on NOOR website. I just hope there were more photographers out there in Pakistan doing this kind of in-depth work. You’d expect so, as you’d expect the aid dollars piling up, considering the magnitude of the natural catastrophe…

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Written by Mikko Takkunen

August 18, 2010 at 7:43 pm

Posted in photojournalism